Category Archives: Photo Tips

Manual mode – do I need it?

Assuming you have or are interested in a camera with manual capability - have you wondered WHY you might want to go to manual mode instead of letting the camera decide?

Here's the real deal - automatic modes work great with fairly even light coming from slightly behind you and the tones you're photographing are either middle tones or there's a good distribution of tones.

Tones being white to black and all the levels of grey and colours in between those extremes.

Expsoure in steam in fog - program vs manual modeWhere auto or program modes start to fail is when you have a mostly white scene - like a white puppy on snow, or being out in fog, which makes a camera think it needs to make the pictures darker and thus white becomes grey. Auto and program modes also have difficulty when the light comes from behind or beside the subject - imagine your child in a white shirt standing in a doorway and the sun is coming from the side (which would be a cool and dramatic picture - what part do you WANT to be exposed right? Do you expose for the bright part of the face or do you expose for the shadow side letting the bright side go completely white?

depth of field - shallow focus - manual modeThe other aspect is how much do you want to be in focus? Do you want shallow focus so that just your partner's face is in focus or do you want to have everything in focus? Auto and program modes default to more of the 'everything in focus.'

In the end - are you TAKING  a picture, ore are you CREATING a picture? If you want to get really creative you want to create each picture - make it look the way you envision it. That skill takes time and practice - and taking lots of pictures, and doing it in manual so that you have control over each aspect of the image.

However if what you're doing is documenting your life and not worrying about being 'artsy' - then program mode is fine and will do a great job.

As in all of photography - the purpose of the photos determines the methods being used.

What to DO with your photography

wallartMillions of photos taken daily never get seen again. I'll bet you're like me and have a ton of photos that you've shot in the last few years and they are sitting in an unused on your computer.

Here's a few ideas to bring out and be used. Not all of them are about making giant enlargements - but then again, why not? (See below.)

1 - Sort Them

I'm a big proponent of Adobe Lightroom. You can buy it for about $149 USD or you can get it on subscription for $10 USD along with Photoshop. By importing all your images to Lightroom you can classify, keyword and rate each image so it is easier to find when you're looking for an image that will meet a specific need.

But that's not the only way to sort images. Your camera likely came with a program that will do much the same sorting and rating – probably not as well but it will work.

Even if you just create folders on your computer such as: Cats, dogs, kids, friends, sky, etc you will then have something to go by when using the images.

There's other programs as well such as ACDSee or Corel AfterShot Pro - and many others. Do a web search and you'll find many options.

2 - Print Them

Load a bunch of your favourites and put them on a USB stick and head off to a lab to get 4x6 prints done of each. It's inexpensive and fun. There are labs, drug stores and even Costco can do great printing. There are also online labs but I prefer going to a local lab.

One of the coolest ideas I've heard to do with prints is get a big basket, drop all the prints into that and put it on the coffee table or side table where people can rummage through the images at their leisure.

You can also put them in albums - which don't get looked at as often but do keep them organized. Really great if you put descriptions beside each image of when they were taken and who was in the image. Great for family histories. Not as important the year they were taken but amazing keepsakes for families.

3 - Screen Saver

screensaverLoad up a special folder on your computer and let it display the images when you're not busy on the computer.

And many TV's can take a USB thumb drive and run slide shows - the biggest best digital frame you probably already own.

Or you can buy a digital frame and let images run that way - another great way to continuously show your images.

4 - Printed Books and 'Magazines'

booksmagsSelect a bunch of images of similar nature - maybe a trip you've taken or certain group of friends, or even your kids doing silly things. If you own a Mac you have Photos installed which lets you assemble and print softcover and hardcover books of your images very easily. I've found the image quality of the Apple created books to be outstanding.

But there are also online labs that can do that as well. Do a quick online search and you'll find lots of ways to print your own books.

5 - Print Them - Big

Make enlargements of your best images. Be proud of your images. One of the quickest way to make your image 'fine art' is to have it printed 20 x 30 inches or bigger in black and white. That looks fantastic on a wall.

6 - Slide Shows

In 2008 I did a project where I crossed Canada driving from Victoria BC to St. John's Newfoundland - all 7500 kilometers. Along the way I stopped every 50 kilometers and photographed whatever was there.  I then did about a year of slide shows for libraries, seniors groups and other groups who were interested.

If you've done a special project or have a good series of images that cover a subject that could be of interest - put together a slide show and get the word out to all your friends, relatives and business associates that you'd like to do presentations.

Conclusion

Doing photography is fun - showing your photography to interested people is even funner. Whether its 4x6 prints in a basket or a slide show for seniors, do something with your photos and you'll discover even more enjoyment in this great hobby.

Discover emotion in every photo you take

Paris emotion photography

Paris Photographer Ciprian LupanMany of us that like taking photos everywhere we go in order to capture best moments of a meeting or a date, or the funniest moments spent with friends. These are moments of life that will be never left behind from our memory.

The best element that can be captured in a photo is emotion. A beautiful photo, taken at the right time, can create an entire story in your memory, a beautiful sequence of events, feelings, smells and that simple photo can make you go in the past.

But how exactly can a photo do this? It is not about the photo, it is about the message of the photo and the transmitted emotion. When taking a photo you have to do your best to capture the essence of life, all the elements of the background at the right place, the beautiful smile of the loved person which reminds you why you love her so much. A wrong detail can ruin your photo and that is why you have to pay a lot of attention in order to get perfect results.

Emotion photographyBut, how can you “capture feelings” in a photo?

1. Capture moments. When you are a photographer and you are collaborating with different kind of couples then you realize that capturing a caress or a glance at the appropriate moment is more than a photo where everything is perfect placed or the landscape is dreamy. If it is necessary you can use some color effects to make your photo look amazing.

2. Be a good reader of the facial expression. The best moment to catch someone’s amazed face expression is the proposal time for sure. In that moment there are millions of thoughts expressed in a single look. A natural smile makes more than a thousand words, so try to get it.

3. Look for details. You have to know where to look. Not only the face and the eyes can share emotion. The gestures, the handshakes, in a couple, the way of walking together, even the laughing of the partners are a key element in capturing happiness.

4. Use Portrait Mode if available on your camera. Try to also make portrait – or vertical orientation – photo in order to capture another side of a person, the natural side. The portrait mode will allow the light to go into the camera in abundance. (editor's note) If you don't have a specific portrait mode on your camera, try aperture priority and set the fstop as open as the lens will go – lower numbers are better, ie f1.8, f2.8, f.3.3 etc.

When having a photo session, every element of the landscape or background must have a purpose. The colors must fit perfect with the mood and must create a universe.

5. Black and white landscapes. Sometimes, a picture in white and black shows more expressions that a colored one. Especially when you are a professional photographer and you have full control of the photos, and you can make any area lighter or darker.

6. Using continuous focus. Moments to surprise a real emotion are rare. So, in order to be prepared, you can set your camera on continuous focus, to have the best photos in every moment.

It is big deal to discover lots of emotions in a photo and everyone that considers himself a professional photographer needs to develop their talent and skill to do this. In that way, you can see beyond the capture taken at a certain moment and create a story. Because great stories use full range of emotions.

Emotion Paris photographyCiprian Lupan is a professional Paris photographer specialized in proposal, engagement, wedding and family photos. If you want to have the best experience and beautiful photos at the Eiffel Tower, just visit the website.

Don’t Let Bad Weather Keep Your Camera Tucked Away

Foggy weather photography

Here in the northern hemisphere, it's winter. And where I am right now - it's very winter. Miserable stuff that snow. Except when you have a camera in your hand.

Then it's a playground. The landscape takes on a very different look, colours become monochrome, crystals form, fog moves in on cat's paws (to quote a poem we learned in high school), rain creates incredible reflections and clouds create wonderful patterns.

When the weather stops being sunny, some of the best opportunities for great photos come around.

A couple of hints for you. Cloudy, rainy, snowy, foggy days all have low contrast and will fool a camera meter to make the picture darker than the scene actually is. Increase your exposure by about one and a half stops to compensate.

Night photos require longer exposures, grab a tripod or place the camera on a sturdy support. If you can set the self-timer you'll get even sharper images, especially with dSLR's because the mirror in the camera won't be moving at the time of the exposure.

 

File 2015-12-28, 9 24 13 PM

Add More Color with Black and White – Part 2

(Continued from part 1)

Adding Interest to a Photo Album

3Not all photos need to be in color when they are included in a photo book. In order to add interest and age to a digital photo album, the photos can be a mix of color and black and white photos. In addition, the aforementioned graphic software programs have filters that can be used to create an aged tone to photos.

A sepia filter will deliver an aged photo appearance to a portrait photo. This type of photo manipulation is seen in photo booths at carnivals and fairs where people dress up in vintage costumes and pose for photos. There are also filters that recreate hand-tinting, such as was found in the early 1960s. The greyscale photos can be printed and hand-tinted using ink kits as well.

It is suggested in this photo book blog that mixing and matching photos in both color and black and white help to add interest to the album and make it a cohesive history of a family and you can also see some examples on their photo book page (scroll down). The scanning of old photos certainly adds an extra amount of entertainment to a family gathering. Everyone loves to look at old photos and poke fun at other family members. The shapes and colors of those old photos add a certain amount of charm to the book.

4Not everyone has old photos from the 1960s, but if they have access to a graphics program, they can create old photos from new photos. By using a Photoshop mask in any of the programs, corners can be cropped and rounded. The addition of a frame in post-production allows the photographer to present a photo as if it was a Polaroid. Many photo ideas and frames can be found online at places like this.

Photo books are the easiest way for a family to put together a history that can be enjoyed for generations to come. These books are easy to create. Beginners will have no problem setting up a great book for their family.

The key to setting up a photo book is the photos themselves. The rest is like adding pieces to a scrapbook. Since the digital camera allows as many photos as the card will hold, there are more than enough chances to get that photo just right. It may take practice to see black and white while looking in color, but the end result will be worth.

by Andre Smith

Add More Color with Black and White

Black and White PhotographyAnsel Adams brought the beauty of the American West through the lens of his camera to the American people. He captured landscapes and scenes that were foreign to many who had never ventured out of a city in their lives. His favorite spot was the wilderness surrounding Yosemite National Park in California, and his favorite technique was the use of black and white to capture and enhance shadows of rocks, valleys and mountain peaks.

His photography was primarily done in black and white in order to capture the depth of color through the use of shades of grey. He believed that color distracted from the overall scene, while black and white allowed the viewer to see everything about the scene. He spent hours getting the right combination of lighting to achieve the photo that he envisioned.

While most digital photography is concentrated on color, there is a whole world that looks beautiful in shades of grey.

Manipulating Color Photos

Manipulating Colour for Black and WhiteThe modern camera and photo manipulation programs allow photographers to shoot their images in full color, and then use a filter to reduce the photo to greyscale. This is a common practice in order to capture the greatest amount of shading. Digital cameras may have the option to shoot in black and white, but there is less control over the photo in the finishing stages when the color data is absent.

The best time to take black and white photos is often on an overcast afternoon. The low contrast will allow the photographer to capture more of the shadows in a softer light rather than the shadows of harsh sunlight. It is easier to control the soft shadows through a graphic program like Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro to maximize the depth of the subject.

However it should be noted a large number of images by Ansel Adams were done in the middle of the day - which does increase the tonal range beyond what most cameras are capable of capturing and he was capable of doing by manipulating the exposure and development of both his film and prings. One can start on sunny days by making sure to keep the highlights from blowing out by reducing the exposure (setting your camera to alert you overexposed ares on the image preview can be found in your camera's manual.) Or you can learn more advanced techniques such as High Dynamic Range photography which is having multiple exposures of once scene combined to have a larger tonal range.

When using a graphic program, there are filters that can be applied to the photos to change the white balance, tones and contrast that will enhance the photo. Adobe's Photoshop and Lightroom can be found at their website and Paint Shop Pro, formerly by JASC, is manufactured by Corel.

(Continued in part 2)

by Andre Smith

Some tips for landscape photography

Been seeing a lot of landscape photography by some very enthusiastic photographers. There's some great photography being created.

However, I do often see a few common issues that can be corrected.

Crooked Horizon Lines: Because of nature (as in bent trees, poles that are actually falling over); or the nature of wide angle lenses - a foreground element may appear to be crooked if the horizon line is level.

Don't let that sway you - the horizon is level.

There may actually be a good reason for the horizon to appear un-level such as a curved shore of water - but that's an illusion and usually means you have to re-orient your camera. Sometimes its as easy as just keeping the camera level side to side and front to back. Sometimes it means you have to move up or down to get the proper perspective.

If your horizon appears crooked - you're photo looses effectiveness. Elements in the photo can be a little crooked - but if the horizon is off the photo will never be as strong as it could be. So really pay attention to that when you look through the camera as you shoot. Its not easy to spot slight problems in level and perspective, but the more you can learn to see that in camera the less time you'll spend on the computer.

If the horizon is obscured by hillsides, mountains, etc - you may have to play with it a bit to figure out what is correct.

There are tools to put on your camera to make sure everything is level - if you continually have problems with level this can be a great investment (and yes I have one in my camera bag.)

Now - if you do miss something, that can generally be fixed in editing. Cropping and rotating can be done with every image software that comes with cameras, or you can find free programs like GIMP (open source image editor - GIMP.org) or with online programs like Picassa, or with higher-level editors like Photoshop or Photoshop Elements.

If you use Photoshop - there's something in the last few editions called "Puppet Warp" which can straighten errant objects if need be.

Horizon Centered
Horizon Closer to top third - notice the road has more drama and depth in this version. Photos by Neil Speers

Centered Horizon: The second thing I often see - and honestly this is something I learned very recently - is the horizon near the centre of the image.

Now, I've known the Rule Of Thirds for a long time so I rarely put the horizon in the middle anyways. The image is typically just more interesting with the horizon one third of the way from the top or the bottom.

But there's a bigger reason - which I mentioned - I just learned. The visual sense of depth of the image is greater by using the Rule of Thirds. By placing the horizon in the middle, you loose the sense of depth.

Now creating a 'flattened image' is fine if you're creating an intentionally 'graphic' image rather than a 'pictorial' image.

Typically however, we're using foreground, middle ground and background to help the viewer sense the same depth which we experienced as we shot it. However because we're translating reality from three dimensions into two dimensions, we have to use tricks to keep that sense of the third dimension and the Rule of Thirds can help with that.

Magic Hour Photography - Bentley
Photographed at the "Magic Hour" just moments after the sun set behind the horizon. Photo by Neil Speers

Not 'using' light to best advantage: Light can hide or reveal, it can bring forward or push backward, it can create moods or not. Many landscape photographers try to only shoot at the "magic hour" which is really about 5 to 10 minutes on a cloudless day when the sun has dipped below the horizon but light is still plentiful.

That's not the only light to use - although it is beautiful when you catch it. Any time of day can be good, but look at where the light is working to create a great picture, and where you might want to 'let that one go' or at least realize it won't be a prize winning shot. Nothing wrong with that - we photograph to capture memories of times and places and not having a picture of something you want to remember is worse than a 'so-so' picture of it. If you can arrange to come back to the same place when the light is better - perfect.

But, sometimes that just isn't possible.

The factors of light to consider: Direction, Quality and Colour.

Trail to Larch Valley - Canadian Rocky Mountains.
Converted to Black and White.
Photo by Neil Speers

Direction: Light from the side brings out more detail than light from behind you. Light from behind the subject can create drama.

Quality: Is it mid-day sunlight which is very harsh, or is it an overcast grey day which happens to make colours in the foreground very saturated? Is there spotty light that can create the dramatic shots (best when you're located under the cloud but an interesting feature/mountain/building is in strong light.)

There is no "bad" light - just "un-interesting" use of it - if its cloudy, concentrait on small subjects, if its sunny concentrait on the big. If the sun is behind you - either look left or right for a subject, or rotate around your subject to get more detail.

One photographer recently suggested if you're shooting mid-day, convert the photos to black and white. Most of Ansel Adams fantastic photos were taken mid day and black and white was part of why they became iconic (although he did do some wonderful colour work as well.)

I hope that helps you create some great landscapes.

Where to focus your camera

Quite often it is best to focus on your intended subject (and if its a person, on their eyes), then hold the focus and recompose the image to make the composition stronger - like having your subject to one side or the other rather than dead center.

Most modern dSLR's have multiple focus points available to get good focus on subjects in the middle as well as to the edges of photos. For most accurate focus it's often best to manually choose a focus point rather than let the camera choose one - an example would be focusing on the subject's eyes.

If you're working with a shallow Depth of Field (see Depth Of Field to learn more about this subject) and use the center point of a multiple point focusing system (common in most dSLRs) then the focus might actually be behind the subject because the 'focal plane' will swing on an arc. Its best to choose a focus point in your camera closest to where you'll want the subject positioned.

Please check out your camera manual to find out how to do that with your specific camera.

Here is an example - if you're shooting a full-length portrait, the best camera height is about waist level and the best focus is on the subject's eyes. (Yes, we've cut off the subject's legs in this illustration, but in a photo you'd show the legs as well.)

However as you swing the camera down to recompose it the focal plane swings in an arc and winds up about the subject's ears rather than the subject's eyes.

If you can chose a focus point nearest where the eyes are, the focus will shift the least and the picture will look its best.

Bathroom 100

This is a great exercise to push your ability to find interesting compositions anywhere. Go into the bathroom, lock the door and take 100 photos of the bathroom itself. The first 30 or so are easy. By the time you're done, you'll find yourself looking at a lot of things a bit different.